Interaction Design Association

A Semi-Theoretical Question

Dan Saffer
October 10, 2006 8:13pm

Post a Response | Jump to Most Recent (27)

If there was a book that covered advanced topics in interaction design, what would those topics be?

By "advanced" I mean, light on methods. No tips for putting together wireframes--that wort of thing.

I have a few topics: cross-cultural design, creating design languages, turning research into design implications, and situated interactions for example.

What would your topics be?

Dan

Dan Saffer
book http://www.designingforinteraction.com
work http://www.adaptivepath.com
site http://www.odannyboy.com

 
David Malouf
October 11, 2006 3:40am

If there was a book that covered advanced topics in interaction design, what would those topics be?

  • What is "DESIGN" in the context of IxD?
  • Dig deeper into the foundational elements of IxD and how they can be used in both education and practice.
  • Converting Research into Designs
  • What are the different types of research? User, Market, Design
  • Team management, Team collaboration, Team building,
  • Getting a design built
  • Ok, that's my take at this point.

    -- dave

     
    Michael Albers
    October 11, 2006 4:24am

    How about this TOC from a book I'm currently working in. One I picture being usable for a graduate level textbook as well as providing a good set of topics for a practitioner.

    <http://umdrive.memphis.edu/malbers/public/TOC-Human-Information-Interaction.pdf

    Mike

    If there was a book that covered advanced topics in interaction design, what would those topics be?
    By "advanced" I mean, light on methods. No tips for putting together wireframes--that wort of thing.

    Dr. Michael J. Albers
    Professional Writing Program
    Department of English
    University of Memphis
    Memphis TN 38152

     
    Daniel Szuc
    October 11, 2006 4:29am

    Hi Folks:

  • Communicating designs effectively at different levels in the organisation
  • techniques, approaches, etc
  • Strategic Design v Visual Design - mapping design objectives to business objectives
  • Translating requirements into Design (other techniques to facilitate this process faster)
  • Designing to communicate value proposition (earlier in the Product Lifecycle)
  • Design to communicate strategic, business value, brand objectives at C level etc
  • Rgds,

    Daniel Szuc
    Principal Usability Consultant
    Apogee Usability Asia Ltd
    www.apogeehk.com
    'Usability in Asia'

    -----

    Original Message -----
    From:
    discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of David Malouf
    Sent: Wednesday, October 11, 2006 7:41 PM
    To: 'ixda'
    Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] A Semi-Theoretical Question

    If there was a book that covered advanced topics in interaction design, what would those topics be?

  • What is "DESIGN" in the context of IxD?
  • Dig deeper into the foundational elements of IxD and how they can be used in both education and practice.
  • Converting Research into Designs
  • What are the different types of research? User, Market, Design
  • Team management, Team collaboration, Team building,
  • Getting a design built
  • Ok, that's my take at this point.

    -- dave


     
    Dave at ixda.org
    October 11, 2006 5:01am

    Daniel, I liked that list a lot.

    One more I thought of is the aesthetics of interaction.

    How do different behaviors effect the affect of a solution/design?

    Dave

    Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

     
    Daniel Szuc
    October 11, 2006 5:26am

    Thanks Dave!

    Perhaps a related point. A question we have been asked in the China UX Community : How does a *Graphic/Visual Designer* become an *Interaction Designer*? Some designers in China see it as a road of design maturity towards being an IxD (which is great!).

    See *benefits* in being able to describe the difference between the two, where both fit in and what it means to be an IxD.

    Rgds,

    Daniel Szuc
    Principal Usability Consultant
    Apogee Usability Asia Ltd
    www.apogeehk.com
    'Usability in Asia'

    -----

    Original Message -----
    From:
    discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Dave at ixda.org
    Sent: Wednesday, October 11, 2006 9:01 PM
    To: 'ixda'
    Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] A Semi-Theoretical Question

    Daniel, I liked that list a lot.

    One more I thought of is the aesthetics of interaction.

    How do different behaviors effect the affect of a solution/design?

    Dave

    Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


     
    Barbara Ballard
    October 11, 2006 5:26am

    In my upcoming book on mobile user experience [1], I provided information about understanding mobile user context, designing for context, device types and a hierarchy of devices, how to select the best technology for your project from a UE perspective, industry structure, design patterns (and mapping them to the hierarchy of devices), and variants on traditional user and usability research methods for mobile - including one new one.

    [1] http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0470033614.html

    -- Barbara Ballard
    barbara at littlespringsdesign.com 1-785-550-3650

     
    Sara Summers
    October 11, 2006 5:27am

    What would your topics be?
    Identifying some interaction conventions. Do we have that?

    Sara Summers
    design
    austin, tx

     
    Dave Malouf
    October 11, 2006 5:48am

    Identifying some interaction conventions. Do we have that? Sara, do you mean "patterns"?
    If so, I highly recommend Jenifer Tidwell's book that came our recently called "Designing Interfaces".
    I caused a sellout of the book by recommending it at UI11 in my workshop there on Monday. ;)
    I wonder if there was an amazon bubble from it?

    Seriously though for anyone interested in IxD patterns, this is really THE book.

    www.designinginterfaces.com

    If you don't mean "patterns", Sarah, what do you mean by conventions?

    I do see space for separating them. I recently wrote an article at UIGarden.net about differentiating conventions, pattherns, guidelines and standards from each other and the value that each does have for designers.
    http://www.uigarden.net/english/The-Place-for-Standards-in-IxD-and-UID

    -- dave

    --

    David Malouf
    Vice President
    dave(at)ixda(dot)org
    http://ixda.org/
    http://synapticburn.com/

    AIM: bolinhanyc // Y!: dave_ux //
    MSN: hippiefunk(at)hotmail.com // Gtalk: dave.ixd(at)gmail.com

     
    Jenifer Tidwell
    October 11, 2006 6:10am

    I'd like to see such a book cover topics such as:

  • Designing for specific contexts of use. Barbara Ballard already mentioned that for mobile devices; we can extend it to other well-known contexts as well.
  • Ways to create and maintain a "flow state" in users, where appropriate.
  • Persuasive interfaces -- how to convince users to participate in certain ways, buy things, contribute, etc.
  • Design implications of artifacts which are (1) social, or (2) situated in space, or (3) highly customized for each user.
  • As the original poster said, cross-cultural and cross-linguistic design.
  • Designing for long-term change and maintenance, a la Steward Brand's "How Buildings Learn."
  • On 10/11/06, Dave Malouf <dave at ixda.org wrote: Identifying some interaction conventions. Do we have that? Sara, do you mean "patterns"?
    If so, I highly recommend Jenifer Tidwell's book that came our recently called "Designing Interfaces".
    I caused a sellout of the book by recommending it at UI11 in my workshop there on Monday. ;)
    I wonder if there was an amazon bubble from it?
    Thanks, Dave -- you beat me to it. :-) (I wasn't watching Amazon earlier this week, so I don't know if there was a bubble, but I'll watch now!)

  • Jenifer
  • Jenifer Tidwell
    jenifer.tidwell at gmail.com
    http://designinginterfaces.com
    http://jtidwell.net

     
    Sara Summers
    October 11, 2006 6:11am

    Sara, do you mean "patterns"?
    If you don't mean "patterns", Sarah, what do you mean by conventions?

    I am unclear of the defining difference(s) myself. If Steve Krug wrote a technical book would they be conventions or patterns?

    Thank you for the book recs,

    Sara

     
    Janna Hicks DeVylder
    October 11, 2006 7:03am

    Really great ideas so far. a couple to add:

    *Best approaches to designing interfaces that are to be shared across sites (aka. multi-brand and/or international environment) *Creating internal best practices (a la Yahoo's pattern library, as an example) and how you have people adopt

    Janna Hicks DeVylder
    Orbitz Worldwide

     
    Michael Micheletti
    October 11, 2006 7:38am

    Hi Dan,

    You might want to cover some of the difficult parachute-in missions designers get sometimes:

  • New designer on a floundering design or development project
  • Taking over a design project from another design house that didn't work out
  • Engineering a turnaround of a released product with design issues
  • Building concensus around design in an otherwise disfunctional organization
  • Moving away from the special forces arena, a discussion of mentoring (and being mentored) might also be appropriate.

    Sounds like a great book. I hope that you write it - I enjoyed and learned from Designing for Interaction.

    Michael Micheletti

    On 10/10/06, Dan Saffer <dan at odannyboy.com wrote: If there was a book that covered advanced topics in interaction design, what would those topics be?
    Dan

     
    Marc Rettig
    October 11, 2006 8:47am

    Hi, Advanced topics in interaction design? Thanks for thinking this way, because really, most of what we all really do is "advanced" compare to what's in most of the books. </whine

    A couple of topics that come to mind.

    Distributed interactions
    Designing for situations where the "interface" is scattered across more than one device. This is coming up more and more often. Relatively easy cases are things like TV + Remote, where there are difficult choices and trade-offs to make about where to situation some of the functionality. I can make a four-button remote, but then I have to load the soft interface on the TV with more complexity.

    More difficult cases: I'm managing my weight for health reasons, so there's a PC interface, maybe a web connection with my physician, a body monitor, and who knows. my shoes? Or more generally, it is increasingly the case that services and products are spread across phone, computer, web, and lord knows what other devices. Many of which are simply platforms we can employ, but we can't really change or even predict what the actual buttons and menus might be.

    Most difficult case: the Holy Grail project of creating an interface to an institution: a company, a government service, a hospital. This of course requires much more than interaction design to actually be able to execute such a thing. Maybe I'm inflating "interaction design" to the point where it will surely just pop.

    All that said, to some degree, we are more and more faced with interactions that span multiple interfaces, some of them not under our control, and a book that shed light on this challenge would be welcome.

    Designing with awareness of / intent to create ripple effects We know of course that introducing any interactive product into a situation changes that situation. But human interactions, and especially social situations, are terribly difficult to understand, never mind effect in a predictable way.

    But techniques from interaction design seem to be useful for this, and certainly some of us (most of us?) are called upon to do this all the time. Sometimes the point of our designs are not so much to deliver new functionality, but to foster new kinds of conversations between people, for example. (That's one reason I like sticky notes so much -- I can use them to design an activity to get people out of their chair and make stuff instead of spouting opinions at each other.)

    There are people out there that know a lot about this. I'd love it if someone put what they know in a book. Okay, maybe it's a set of books.

  • Marc
  • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Marc Rettig
    Fit Associates, LLC
    marc at fitassociates.com

     
    Dave Malouf
    October 11, 2006 9:17am

    Marc, that was excellent!!!!

    It also got me thinking about interactions using location context. Not necessarily ubiquitous computing per se (though that might be good), but what does it mean to have geo-location as an axis of information/interaction management?

    Dan, what a great thread!!! The suggestions alone are keeping my synapses burning all day long.

    -- dave

     
    Sean Voisen
    October 11, 2006 10:17am

    Marc, that was excellent!!!!

    I agree. Very thought-provoking.

    I'm personally very interested in the interaction design of real-time, face-to-face social gatherings like workshops, seminars, conferences and un-conferences, and the design of supportive technologies/interfaces that can improve these gatherings as far as collaboration, communication and, most especially, learning . both high tech and low tech technologies. Everything from giant, digital "whiteboards" and wifi accessible social networking sites that facilitate physical meet-ups to the arrangement of a room and the format of a discussion.

    I spent two "experimental" years as a management consultant designing such meetings and workshops to achieve specific business objectives, so I think about this a lot. If anyone knows of any good books or resources on this kind of interaction design, do let me know ;-)

    Sean

    -- Sean Voisen
    Interaction Design Technologist
    http://seanvoisen.com

     
    Janna Hicks DeVylder
    October 11, 2006 11:44am

    Ok, I'm ready to attend the conference that discusses all of these topics, please!

    janna

    Janna Hicks DeVylder
    Orbitz Worldwide

     
    Dave Malouf
    October 11, 2006 11:52am

    Me too!

    Wanna help make it happen?

    The IxDA board has several possibilities in the works for IxD events:

    1) We are doing our IA Summit Pre-conference again this year and these and other topics could definitely be a part of it.

    2) The Board has been talking about doing a leadership retreat.

    3) We are also talking about a full-on 2-3 day conference on IxD.

    The latter two would probably be in 2008 due to the planning and coordination that is required, though # 2 could happen probably at the end of 2007 if we like, or be connected to something like DUX as a pre-event to DUX.

    What do people think about any or all of these ideas? What other ideas for big gatherings about IxD are people interested in.

  • dave
  • Janna Hicks DeVylder wrote:
    Ok, I'm ready to attend the conference that discusses all of these topics, please!
    janna
    Janna Hicks DeVylder
    Orbitz Worldwide


    --

    David Malouf
    Vice President
    dave(at)ixda(dot)org
    http://ixda.org/
    http://synapticburn.com/

    AIM: bolinhanyc // Y!: dave_ux //
    MSN: hippiefunk(at)hotmail.com // Gtalk: dave.ixd(at)gmail.com

     
    Janine Griffin
    October 11, 2006 12:03pm

    Designing for a user interface that is configured for specific (and diverse) applications in the marketplace. What the business distributes is a more "generic" UI that you know is going to support a lot of different configurations. The configuration tool (with its own set of users) filters the whole set of functionality to program the product only with the functions a particular customer needs.

    Another topic would be designing a UI for a family of products. Especially a challenge when the other members are just words on a wishlist.

    Regards,
    Janine
    +++++ Janine Griffin
    Pounamu Interaction Design Ltd
    www.pounamu.com

    Dan Saffer wrote:
    If there was a book that covered advanced topics in interaction design, what would those topics be?
    By "advanced" I mean, light on methods. No tips for putting together wireframes--that wort of thing.
    I have a few topics: cross-cultural design, creating design languages, turning research into design implications, and situated interactions for example.
    What would your topics be?
    Dan

     
    Dave Malouf
    October 11, 2006 12:10pm

    Janine,
    Two undercurrents come to mind when I read the below:

    Enterprise Application Design
    Platform Application Design

    Enterprise applications are always personalized, configured and customized and thus the product out of the box is never the same product that the end-user experiences.

    Platform Application Design is related because to do the former well, you need to have a solid platform foundation for developers/system integrators to work within.

    Another thought, is the narratives . interaction design as story telling.

    it might be interesting to start creating some sort of categorization of these ideas as some are angled toward the theoretical and others toward the practical and within them, some are for specific environments, contexts or mediums and others are more transportable horizontally.

    --d ave

    Janine Griffin wrote:
    Designing for a user interface that is configured for specific (and diverse) applications in the marketplace. What the business distributes is a more "generic" UI that you know is going to support a lot of different configurations. The configuration tool (with its own set of users) filters the whole set of functionality to program the product only with the functions a particular customer needs. Another topic would be designing a UI for a family of products. Especially a challenge when the other members are just words on a wishlist. Regards,
    Janine
    +++++
    Janine Griffin
    Pounamu Interaction Design Ltd
    www.pounamu.com
    Dan Saffer wrote:
    If there was a book that covered advanced topics in interaction design, what would those topics be?
    By "advanced" I mean, light on methods. No tips for putting together wireframes--that wort of thing.
    I have a few topics: cross-cultural design, creating design languages, turning research into design implications, and situated interactions for example.
    What would your topics be?
    Dan


    --

    David Malouf
    Vice President
    dave(at)ixda(dot)org
    http://ixda.org/
    http://synapticburn.com/

    AIM: bolinhanyc // Y!: dave_ux //
    MSN: hippiefunk(at)hotmail.com // Gtalk: dave.ixd(at)gmail.com

     
    Edwin Booth
    October 11, 2006 2:36pm

    I second Marks' first two suggestions, although I'd rename the first one to 'multi-touch point systems' or something similar and hopefully less geeky sounding.

    In this space I see two big themes you could cover - one is the thing+another thing = product - i.e. the TV+remote - where a single experience is distributed across different physical objects.

    Another is a single overall system with multiple user types, each with multiple possible points of contact tailored to their access rights and needs. For example, in enterprise systems an IT admin would access their 'admin' functions via a desktop PC, handheld and/or cell phone. While a 'task worker' might access specific content/functions created by their admin from a handheld and/or PC. Meanwhile an uber-admin manages the whole thing from their PC/handheld/cell phone.

    Designing for each individual user/touch point while maintaining overall coherency of the system AND achieving effective scalability, localization, customization, etc would class as 'advanced' in my mind.

    My two cents any way.

    Ted

    On Wednesday, October 11, 2006, at 09:53AM, Marc Rettig <mrettig at well.com wrote: Distributed interactions
    Designing for situations where the "interface" is scattered across more than one device. This is coming up more and more often. Relatively easy cases are things like TV + Remote, where there are difficult choices and trade-offs to make about where to situation some of the functionality. I can make a four-button remote, but then I have to load the soft interface on the TV with more complexity.
    More difficult cases: I'm managing my weight for health reasons, so there's a PC interface, maybe a web connection with my physician, a body monitor, and who knows. my shoes? Or more generally, it is increasingly the case that services and products are spread across phone, computer, web, and lord knows what other devices. Many of which are simply platforms we can employ, but we can't really change or even predict what the actual buttons and menus might be.

     
    Doug Murray
    October 12, 2006 8:26am

    Many excellent ideas. A common theme seems to be going beyond the web page to include other types of interactions. Perhaps many of the ideas could be addressed (in some fashion, at least) with:

  • Real World IxD - Moving from Web/Software Design to Experience Design (and if it were offered as a workshop at a conference, Marc would be a great one to teach it!)
  • "Marc Rettig" <mrettig at well.com 10/11/2006 10:47 AM Hi,
    Advanced topics in interaction design? Thanks for thinking this way, because really, most of what we all really do is "advanced" compare to what's in most of the books. </whine

    NOTICE: This email message is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and destroy all copies of the original message.

     
    Brad Lauster
    October 12, 2006 8:55am

    Hi Dan,

    A few suggestions:

    1. Based on the panel at BayCHI earlier this week: interaction design for emergent behavior

    2. I'll echo Marc's suggestion: distributed interactions

    3. I think framing is an important topic, both in terms of how we frame the problem and how we frame our relationship with the user.

    4. Interaction design solutions as platforms for other interaction designs. For example, a programmer builds an API so that other programmers can more easily build their programs. Couldn't we do something similar with our designs?

    5. And here are some topics that I think should be getting more attention in our community. I'd like to see more writing about these topics as they relate to interaction design:

  • Behaviors
  • Motivations
  • Contexts
  • Ethics
  • Caring
  • Humanity
  • There are also other topics I'd like to see more writing about as well, but most of them aren't necessarily interaction design, so they're probably not appropriate suggestions for this thread - scenario planning, for example.

    Thanks for the question, Dan. This is a good thread!

    Brad Lauster
    http://bradlauster.com/

    On Oct 10, 2006, at 9:13 PM, Dan Saffer wrote:


    If there was a book that covered advanced topics in interaction design, what would those topics be?
    By "advanced" I mean, light on methods. No tips for putting together wireframes--that wort of thing.
    I have a few topics: cross-cultural design, creating design languages, turning research into design implications, and situated interactions for example.
    What would your topics be?
    Dan Dan Saffer
    book http://www.designingforinteraction.com
    work http://www.adaptivepath.com
    site http://www.odannyboy.com


     
    Dan Saffer
    October 12, 2006 9:45am

    Thanks all for the suggestions. Some really strong ideas.

    Clearly there are many books left to be written about our discipline!

    Dan

    Dan Saffer
    book
    http://www.designingforinteraction.com
    work http://www.adaptivepath.com
    site http://www.odannyboy.com

     
    David (Heller) Malouf
    October 12, 2006 9:51am

    ANDDDD!!@!!!!

    WE have more than enough material to cover for an IxD specific conference. 8-) To help book writers test their material and encourage discourse and dialog about their ideas.

    8-)

    Thanx Dan for starting this awesome thread!

    We were drowning in job posts for a while there. 8-)

    -- dave

    -----

    Original Message -----
    From:
    discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Dan Saffer
    Sent: Thursday, October 12, 2006 1:46 PM
    To: ixda
    Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] A Semi-Theoretical Question

    Thanks all for the suggestions. Some really strong ideas.

    Clearly there are many books left to be written about our discipline!

    Dan

    Dan Saffer
    book http://www.designingforinteraction.com
    work http://www.adaptivepath.com
    site http://www.odannyboy.com


     
    k lenox
    October 12, 2006 11:46pm

    great discussion/thread, thanks dan . my 2 cents (things hopefully not duplicated) .
    patent process while designing/iterating & how to support a design team to be creative and not infringe on existing patents (device and application patents)
    how to build an AUI specification/design guide
    taking the concept to spec-level - team building, process, lifecycle

  • is it a different team that specs out the concept? or does the same team oversee it? at what level of contribution?
    how do you maintain the essence of a product concept without it getting watered down in the process (tech limitations, price constraints, etc)
    examples of presentations of concepts for different audiences - designer-peers, engineers, marketing, execs, etc
  • how the
    presentation/story/communication varies depending on audience. we all know the story is different, but seeing examples would be great how to design a global product solution when the research clearly shows different cultures require different features and functionality (and it's not a website) - where do you compromise?
  • case studies of distributed interactions, such as: experience design that's more contextually based, not device/screen specific
    multi-user interaction design
    multi-location interaction design
    home entertainment & appliances
    medical equipment - consumer and professional
    PUI (physical UI) design and interaction models relative to GUI AUI - audio UI

    stuff that's been mentioned before:
    interaction design pattern library (but not screenshots & not just web - real animation clips)
    distributed interactions

    -kim lenox

     
    James Leftwich, IDSA
    October 13, 2006 9:28am

    Here are a few advanced topics in interaction design that have arisen throughout my 23-year career in interaction design:

    1) Designing integrated physical device controls and software interactional architectures, rather than treating them as separate, sequential efforts. This is a particularly crucial topic for the field of interactive product design. Interaction design is still, unfortunately, too often thought of as just the software, when the full user experience must tightly and wholistically integrate the physical and software aspects of a product from its earliest conception.

    2) Developing Operating System-level and application framework user interfaces. This addresses the issues involved in developing not just an application, but the user interface framework for an entire OS, from which all applications and interactions will be embodied. Issues involving developing UI components, interactional syntaxes, style guides, multiple application flows, etc.

    3) Strategies and methodologies for developing componentized interactional languages and patterns. Complex systems requiring a wide variety of functions and flexibility are best approached not by attacking each function or need individually, but first creating a set of interactional components and syntactical rules, from which a wide variety of usage can be embodied. In an iterative fashion, generally involving co-developing the interactional language along with the initial functional and interactional needs of the product or system, a logical and componentized system is developed. This is a powerful approach to designing systems, which makes it easier for future functions or applications to be developed within a logical and simple language. It also greatly benefits a wider range of user needs, through requiring users to only become familiar with the limited set of interactional components and syntactical conventions.

    4) Designing interfaces for small devices with limited physical controls, displays, and other sensorial feedback. The overwhelming majority of interaction design is still limited to desktop software and web-based sites and applications. This presents problems again and again when strategies and approaches that work in these domains are carried over to fundamentally different device and usage domains without regard to the wide range of fundamental differences between domains, and different strategies for successfully designing within them.

    5) Rapid Special Forces Design, Extreme Design Makeovers, and Skunkworks Approaches. Issues involved in, strategies and methodologies for using small, high-level teams with executive-level mandates to effect large-scale design efforts on complex systems in short periods of time.

    6) Special topics in interaction design consulting. Consultants face unique challenges in the discipline of interaction design. Being brought in late, having to work alone or in small teams, and with tiny budgets and tight schedules. Topics include successfully establishing mandates at the highest levels in client corporations, the politics of design among sometimes competing departments (finance, engineering, marketing), techniques for successfully communicating complex design strategies, strategies for successfully cross-pollinating solutions between different interactional and product domains.

    7) The importance of apprenticing with experienced practitioners and the equal importance of mentoring proteges through side-by-side project experiences. The field and discipline of interaction design is far more complex than has ever been described in textbooks and academic classes. Interaction design is an applied art, involving putting fundamentals into dynamic practice. The best and most powerful way to learn the complex art of interaction design is to seek out and work alongside an experienced practitioner. Of equal importance to our field and its future is the responsibility of every experienced interaction designer to seek out less-experienced practitioners to teach and mentor in real world situations.

    Jim

    James Leftwich, IDSA
    Orbit Interaction
    Palo Alto, California USA
    www.orbitnet.com

    On Oct 11, 2006, at 10:47 PM, discuss-
    request at lists.interactiondesigners.com wrote:

    On 10/10/06, Dan Saffer <dan at odannyboy.com wrote: If there was a book that covered advanced topics in interaction design, what would those topics be?
    Dan

     
    Log In to Post a Response
    Re: A Semi-Theoretical Question

    Name

    E-mail Address

    Back to Top

    Copyright © 2004-2006 Interaction Design Association.